Your experiences on BSMS course

Discussion in 'Brighton and Sussex Medical School' started by NewWave, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. NewWave

    NewWave New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was wondering about your personal experiences on the course. During clinical practice in first and second year what did you do?

    How did the family study with the new born baby go what exactly did that entail?

    I know its not a PBL course as such but how does clinical symposia relate to what your been taught.

    It mentions small group teaching in the prospectus with 8-16 students what were those like, what kind of topics does it cover?

    I've also heard that the anatomy teaching was particularly good hows it been for you?

    :confused:;)
     
  2. canoechick

    canoechick New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2005
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey,
    We have a clincal practise day once a week in 1st and second years, in the mornings we have lectures and small group sessions on stuff like communication skills, takng histories, ethical scenarios etc. In the afternoon of that day we rotate between g.p, secondary care, clincal skills workshop (where you learn examinations stuff like how to do a cardio examination) and personal study - in other words 2 out of every four weeks you will have a placement. Once you have learnt stuff like examinations and history taking you get to practise them on patients who come into your g.p.s surgery.

    Baby study was really cool - very cute! you get to follow a baby that you get assigned at the very beginning of year one for the majority of your first year and see how it develops over the duration of the time you visit. Helps you learn stuff like child development and health promotion initiatives for infants.

    Yeah the anatomy teaching is very good here, as a bonus unlike lots of the other newer med schools we do dissections which really helps with visualising and understanding what you cover in lectures.

    Hope that helps!
     
  3. scaryhair

    scaryhair New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2008
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'd also be interested in hearing about any other BSMS experiences.

    Also, this may be a bit of a stupid question, but as BSMS is a medical school made up of both the universities of Brighton and Sussex, do the medical students get access to the facilities of both universities, or just the one that they live in halls for?
     
  4. pauly

    pauly New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2004
    Messages:
    85
    Likes Received:
    0
    was wondering about your personal experiences on the course. During clinical practice in first and second year what did you do?

    Clinical practice in the first and second year consists of one afternoon a week in primary or secondary care. In primary care, you partner up with someone in your year and are allocated a GP, which is good for continuity of clinical teaching throughout the year.The GP visits also link to the systems based teaching, i.e. if you are learning about the cardiovascular system, the GP may purposely bring in a patient with cardiovascular signs to examine, in addition to the normal flux of patients. Secondary care visits involve the usually deparments such as cardiology, psychiatry ect.


    Clinical symposia draw together the underlying science (physiology, anatomy ect.) with the clinical aspects of whatever the subject for the session is, and is a principal example of systems based teaching. There are bits of PBL throughout the course, but not much to be honest - so think about how you would like to be taught.

    A major advantage of BSMS over other medical schools is the small year sizes (around 130- others can be 400+). In the last 10 years, medical school numbers have expanded vastly (sometimes doubled) and is often cited by medical professionals as being detrimental to medical education. You recieve small group teaching in various components of the course, such as anatomy, scientific basis of medicine and clinical skills. These groups often change each year, so you will find you quickly get to know everyone in your year well.


    As a BSMS student, you are a member of both universities and as such, you are free to access all university facilities, clubs, societies, union events, libraries ect. As you can imagine, this is also very handy on many fronts.

    Best wishes.
     
  5. scaryhair

    scaryhair New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2008
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks. Thought I had read that somewhere (prospectus or website) before, but I couldn't remember properly so I wasn't sure whether I was making it up or not :p:
     
  6. DanceDance

    DanceDance New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    I personally LOVE the course, and the clinical days are my favourite parts of it, meeting patients, seeing a baby grow up and a chronic patient's disease progress are more gripping than any soap you could possibly think of. Writing a portfolio of your expeirences after these is a bit of a shame, and something I do not really enjoy, but a small price to pay!

    The small group learnings are only done a couple of times a week, once in the morning of clinical days which are often on ethical issues or clinical teaching, such as how to fill out a prescription, and the other is usually a focused teaching session on a specific and hard to understand topic, such as a certain pathway within the brain.

    Yes our anatomy teaching is amazing, and I think BSMS put a special emphasis on this. Prof Darrell Evans is an amazing anatomy teacher and gives lectures with enthusiasm and astounding depth (me being a student at BSMS doesn't make me biased, honest!)

    Below is a short clip of Prof Evans explaining foetal development in a lecture, but remixed into a dance (as its much more fun that way) - Look at the arm movements and enthusiasm. THIS is how lecturers should behave!

    YouTube - Prof Evans dances in a BSMS embryology lecture
     
  7. NewWave

    NewWave New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0

    Thanks very informative, you seem to like posting that video every chance you get :)
     
  8. DanceDance

    DanceDance New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2009
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    You know how it is - :p

    Any information you want please dont hesitate to ask, I will say again that many of the studies like the family study are great to do but you hate them when writing them up!
     
  9. NewWave

    NewWave New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    I remember talking to this Canadian guy on the open day, the only thing that was on the tedious was the write ups after each clinical experience. However i suppose you'll do it in any course and its a small price to pay.
     
  10. doctork2

    doctork2 New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2011
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi, I'm a grade 11 student from Canada who is interested in coming to BSMS. How do they treat the international students there? How many international students are there?

    Thank you,

    doctork2
     
  11. halfadoc

    halfadoc New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey I know of a fair few international students at bsms, think there about 10 per year? They are treated well - no differently from home students but as bsms is a lovely uni, that is very well :). I recommend bsms for sure :)
     
  12. adam89

    adam89 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sounds great
     

Share This Page