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What else can you do with a Medicine degree except Medicine?

Discussion in 'General Careers Advice' started by Fonzie, May 31, 2007.

  1. Fonzie

    Fonzie Member

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    Hello there.

    Now I'm not for one minute suggesting that I want to do something else with the Medicine degree. Medicine is my passion and that's why I'm going to medical school.

    But I must admit I have my concerns with regards to the fact that every year according to statistics there will be 10,000 doctors who are left unemployed as they were unable to secure a training post. The option to go abroad exists however, I was wondering what other careers a Medicine degree could open doors towards?

    I have heard that it is possible to work in "The City" with a medical degree and the degree would give an advantage when competing against graduates from top universities like Oxbridge and LSE?

    If anyone could shed some light on this topic for me, I'd be extremely grateful.

    Thank you.

    The Fonz.
     
  2. Evolution

    Evolution New Member

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    well i'd like to point you to a blog by a man called Hoover. His blog, www.medschoolhell.com, talks about his journey through the med school and into his own business based on medicine. His blog is funny and provides tip[s on how to make money out of medicine. It's a US blog but alot of the tips still apply.
     
  3. Fonzie

    Fonzie Member

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    Thanks for the quick reply!

    I'll have a read through that.
     
  4. Spencer Wells

    Spencer Wells Noodly Doctory Moderator

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    Allied to medicine there are things such as medical journalism and big pharma, but the skills developed during the medical degree can equally be applied to the business world.
    A medical degree shows that you can work and apply yourself, and employers love to see that. If you're worried about competing against graduates from the "big name" universities, you could always go there to study medicine, then whatever you decide to do with your medical degree, you'll look good.
     
  5. Fonzie

    Fonzie Member

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    Well I'm going to PMS to study Medicine. I'm hoping the Exeter name might count for something in that respect.
     
  6. Brooke

    Brooke New Member

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    This is just a guess... and a question too, I guess. You could go into research, or teaching...
     
  7. Magnetic

    Magnetic New Member

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    Yeah i have had this thought myself --- i absolutely love cellular and molecular biology. Applying this to medicine really really appeals to me, but if i do want to continue studying/researching in this field, is research available for all science graduates, or are there posts which ONLY medical graduates can apply for?
     
  8. Spencer Wells

    Spencer Wells Noodly Doctory Moderator

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    I've never seen research posts advertised for ONLY medical graduates, but it certainly wouldn't hinder you if you had a medical degree on top of an academic PhD. Having a medical degree also makes it easier to get involved in clinical research (i.e. featuring patients), if that floats your boat, but it's not a necessity.
     
  9. mussed

    mussed New Member

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    I'm a soon to be Oxbridge graduate. All the big names in everything - consulting, investment banking, accounting, even law - want people with degrees in anything, good extracurrics and evidence of having applied oneself. More specifically, consultancies (all the NHS outsourcing) and drug companies love doctors. Oxbridge etc really doesn't get you as far as it used to except for the recruitment/contacts level - you don't get shooed in cos they "know your tutor" except for teaching positions at big boarding schools. Don't worry too much about the future, Fonzie... by the time you get there it will be different and a medical degree is as good as anything to be spending your time on.
     
  10. LS5050

    LS5050 New Member

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    Well....

    I think the great thing about a Medicine degree is that it is transferable worldwide, and just because the NHS is making cut backs, it doesnt mean other governments are. The skills you learn during your training can be used for a whole range of jobs. One big industry is Sports. Unless the film Wall:e actually happens, people will be exercising for many years to come, and with exercise comes injury. There are thousands of Sports teams and clubs all over the World that require medics and doctors to treat athletes. From medicine it is only a short hop to physiotherapy and rehabilitation.

    Just something to think about!!
     
  11. new2newmedia

    new2newmedia New Member

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    Hi Fonzie, where did you get this 10,000 number from? To me this seems very high. Looking at UCAS data last year 9,246 people were accepted at medical school (including dentistry). I don't quite understand how 10,000 can be left unemployed at any point of the training process.

    Even with the new funding arrangements the government will be footing well over 100k for each medical student over their course so they are likely to keep quite a tight grip on the number entering university if there are less places after. Remember also that the NHS is the only domestic department to receive a real term increase in funding so of all the areas of public service it is one of the most secure (in my opinion).

    Anyway, to your original question and assuming the doomsday scenario that you are unemployed after graduation/foundation training/whatever. You would have lots of other options should you wish.

    If you wanted to work in "The City" then you would have as good a chance as anyone else. My personal opinion on this is that it's very much down to personality rather than where you went to university. The idea that it's all old Etonions who did classics is quite unrepresentative now. Friends of mine who work there are competitive and ruthless. Without wishing to step on people's toes if you are more of the surgeon medic (where you probably need to be quite competitive) then I'm sure you would do well. If you are more of a GP empathetic compassionate type then I would steer clear of the city if I were you. Anyway, certainly your degree would not disadvantage you and being handy at maths especially what I would call "UKCAT maths" will be an advantage.

    You could also teach. Science teachers are in demand and depending on your degree grade you get decent incentives to train, surprisingly good pay and decent prospects. It would be quite different if you wanted to teach English where there is more of a glut.

    Right, I've rambled on far too long. To summarise, I wouldn't worry about finding a medical post after training too much (unless you pick the most competitive surgery in the most popular region after your foundation training). However, if for whatever reason you do not continue with medicine there is a wide variety of other jobs you would be well placed for.

    Hope that helps.
     

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