1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

US to UK College GPA conversion?

Discussion in 'International Medical Students' started by windycitycassie, Apr 15, 2006.

  1. windycitycassie

    windycitycassie New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi, all. :)

    I can't really figure this out... How do you convert a US college GPA to a British one? I am taking a few classes at a local University while I'm still in the States, and am wondering how they'd convert over. Obviously I am hoping to get an A, which should come across well, I just wonder how Bs look.
     
    #1 windycitycassie, Apr 15, 2006
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2006
  2. ANDREAS

    ANDREAS New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2005
    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have applied from a US school to a UK School
    I never had a clear answer on this but emal the schools and ask them what GPA they r asking from.

    I know St. Georges and Nottingham at Derby are asking for at least 3.0 and for those you have to take the GAMSAT

    Having gone through this process I would say:
    3.0-3.3 - 2:2
    3.3- 3:5 2:!
    3.5+ 1st

    even though I believe it is a bad conversion because it is hard to get these grades

    also..if you are not EU member then your chances are low
     
  3. windycitycassie

    windycitycassie New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks, Andreas. :) Yeah, I did a bit of looking and the 2:2 seems appropriate. :( Ugh. And I'll still need to take science A levels, especially if I need to take the GAMSAT I'd think.

    I have about 3 years of time to prepare and do whatever I need to get approved... In 3 years I'll qualify as a resident due to being married to a Brit and living there.

    Any suggestions? I guess I'm screwed in terms of GPA, so I need a stellar GAMSAT and As in A levels?
     
  4. sural001

    sural001 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2003
    Messages:
    406
    Likes Received:
    0
    If it helps, I did a quick Google search and it seems that Cambridge consider a GPA of 3.8 to be equivalent to 1st class honours. To be honest, I don't think they're even directly comparable, as the American method of assessment is so different from that in Britain.
     
  5. psyche87

    psyche87 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2005
    Messages:
    382
    Likes Received:
    0
    Actually, I think that between even universities in the US, it's difficult to compare GPAs due to grade inflation (or the lack of). And obviously it's very hard to compare the UK and US systems given that the systems work so differently (as sbailey said). But generally, it seems to me that the "accepted" conversion from a few scholarship boards here (who send people to study in the US and the UK) is
    3.8-4.0: 1st
    3.6-3.8: 2:1
     
  6. GladtoB

    GladtoB New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think, as psyche87 said, it's v. difficult to compare. I and some friends I know of were succesful applying for medicine in the U.K. this year and here are the final GPAs we were asked for:
    Oxford GEM: 3.5 or higher
    Cambridge 6-yr: 3.4 or higher
    Imperial: 3.4 or higher

    These may not be general offers, I don't know if they were tailored to our individual situations/backgrounds. These grades are very hard to achieve, and if you go to an Ivy or v. rigorous school it can be even harder to graduate with this level of GPA. That said, it is about the range that the most competitive U.S. medical schools ask for too, so it definitely was not easier to get in in the U.K. Bear in mind everybody's situation is different: for my friends and I, none of us are U.S. (or U.K.) citizens, and all of us did A levels, so that was probably taken into consideration too. Having proved ourselves at A levels may have helped, some of us had even got into U.K. medical schools straight from high school and turned them down to go to the U.S. It also helped to prove that we were competitive on the U.S. level: by our GPAs, having scored highly on the MCAT and similar things, because none of us wanted the schools to think we were applying there because we couldn't get in in the U.S. Also they look at how serious you are about studying in the U.K. -- all of us had important reasons for choosing the U.K. over the U.S. (for me: my family is here, and I highly respect the training here), but I know many of these schools aren't keen on accepting people for whom medicine in the U.K. is a backup.
     
    #6 GladtoB, Jul 16, 2006
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2006
  7. Bambi

    Bambi New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2003
    Messages:
    2,496
    Likes Received:
    0
    That is dfinately more accurate than what andreas said. I have a friend studting in America and when she came here for a semester 61% here was equivalent to an A in America and for us 61% is just barely a 2.1
     
  8. GladtoB

    GladtoB New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'd heed psyche87's advice and steer clear of generalizations. Even within schools grades vary widely. I took an organic chemistry class (one of the most effective "weeder" classes to separate "real" pre-meds from the "wannabe" ones). It was the most gruelling class I have ever taken in my life, A levels, the MCAT and all the other "hard" classes I have taken did not even begin to compare with this class - and there a 61% was by a longshot definitely an A. On the other hand consider that the class average on our midterm was 27% you can see why. More than 10 people (in a 400+) class got 0%. I worked hard and I was very happy with my 38% grade on that midterm. On the other hand consider a 400 person Biology class I took where the professor told us at the first session that he was only giving 4 students As. I can't tell you how frustrating it was to see my hard, hard work, and correspondingly great performance on all the tests and assignments amount to an A- in the end. Yet my average % was in the 90s. So making general statements about grading in the US (and I'm sure this applies in the UK too) is a v. dangerous thing to do.
     
    #8 GladtoB, Jul 18, 2006
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2006
  9. Bambi

    Bambi New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2003
    Messages:
    2,496
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yeah I expect it does vary quite a bit, she went to the University of Florida by the way, dont know how good it's meant to be.
     
  10. Scottish Chap

    Scottish Chap Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2004
    Messages:
    413
    Likes Received:
    0
    It can't be done fairly. The two systems could not be more different. When I applied to U.S. medical schools, I had to do something similar (U.K.->U.S. conversion) and there are professional agencies in the U.S. that can estimate this. The U.K. probably has something similar.
     
  11. Scottish Chap

    Scottish Chap Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2004
    Messages:
    413
    Likes Received:
    0
    61% would be a D in America - a failing grade. Even with curving, most A's are awarded for scores >86%.
     
  12. Racquel

    Racquel New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2007
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi windycitycassie or ANYONE ELSE.....HELP


    HI,

    As per your post, you referred to professional agencies in the US that can estimate the U.K->US Conversion re Qualifications. I am having some trouble with a US University getting the weight of my UK qualifications, as you said its unfair for them to simply say that my Bs and Cs are insufficient especially since the overall qualification has 60 Master level credits attached (which they have not even taken into consideration). Please direct me to some of these websites of agencies that can convert fairly so that I can present my case. I have a couple days to do this.

    Thanks much, I really need help with this. Why do admission officers just arbitrarily make decisions on what they think they know instead of doing a little research re the US system of education (more difficult) as compared to the US.

    THANKS, awaiting your response.
     
  13. Scottish Chap

    Scottish Chap Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2004
    Messages:
    413
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you provide more info., perhaps I can help; not sure if it's appropriate to openly advertise companies. Where is your degree from? What are you trying to get into? I receive so many PM's and e-mails about this and I don't recall your specific case.

    The short response to your last question is that the U.S. rightly gives priority to their own and if you want into their sytsem, you have to play by their rules - as unreasonable as some of them are. This is a tool to cut down on applicants, nothing more, and I don't think it reflects an innate distrust of other educational systems. Ph.D. and M.S. programs in the U.S. welcome foreign credentials, as an example.
     
    #13 Scottish Chap, Jun 9, 2007
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2007
  14. chatterbox123hi

    chatterbox123hi New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2008
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    hey

    well, im thinking about moving to America and doing my Psychology degree there, like you guys, i'm unable to convert my grades to the US system which you guys call GPA :confused:..
    Since we have a different system here and we finish school at the age of 16 and then we do another 2 yrs of college in which we choose 3 subejects called A levels.

    The thing with A LEVELS is that, all unis, pretty much all of them require you to have take at least 3 A LEVELS, for example, im taking Psychology, English lit and Film studies... now for me to do psychology at my uni i need 280 POINTS, that means i have to get BBC on my three subject im taking! (i hope this will info will help some of you.....) :)

    im working at those grades at the moment, now how do i convert my grades into the american system??? hehe

    thanks

    xox
     
  15. DrBuckley

    DrBuckley New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2008
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    A US to UK conversion is quite difficult to do. Your GPA is determined by how many classes you take and what grades you earn in those classes. A=4.0, B=3.0, C=2.0, D=1.0, F=O. However, some universties further split their grades into A+, A, A-, etc and assign values to them in that way.

    So if you wanted to apply to an American university from the UK, it would all depend on the university. In the US we finish high school at 18 and receive a GPA based on all the classes we've taken in the last four years of school. Most universities require an entrance exam called the SAT, but another popular one is the ACT. It basically tests reading comprehension, mathematics, lit. composition, and the basic sciences (biology, chemistry, physics). Entrance to the university depends on: GPA, SAT score, extra cirricular activities, personal statment, letters of recommendation. Some universities simply require a certain GPA and an SAT score.

    Basically, if you're wanting to attend a university in the U.S., make sure you can attend a university in the UK. The standards are similar, with the US standards probably being lower depending on the school - obviously schools in the Ivy League are very competitive.

    Also, higher education in the US is very expensive for international students, but lots of scholarships are available.
     

Share This Page