UCL - Teaching Methods

Discussion in 'Royal Free and University College Medical School' started by christhomas71, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. christhomas71

    christhomas71 New Member

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    Could someone tell me how the course at UCL is delivered? Lectures/PBL/Labs etc
     
  2. Spencer Wells

    Spencer Wells Noodly Doctory Moderator

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    Lectures, labs and tutorials make up the most of it, with large amounts of dissection thrown in and the odd 2 hour PBL session. Then there's the once-weekly sessions that you spend in hospital learning clinical skills, seeing patients or in tutorials.
    This is of course only for preclinicals, because when clinical study starts you'll be in hospital 9-5 (or 8-5 for a surgical firm).
     
  3. Khush23

    Khush23 New Member

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    Hi, just wondering, what sorts of things do you do in the labs? xx
     
  4. Spencer Wells

    Spencer Wells Noodly Doctory Moderator

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    There are pharmacology labs where you'll for example administer adrenaline to guinae-pig ileum and measure it's contraction, or where you'll take nitrous oxide or drink vodka and measure how your reaction time and pain threshold change, or get injected with different concentrations of lignocaine to measure its effects. Then there are histology labs, looking at slides, embryology ones using a piece of software called "The Embryonic Disk," and physiology labs involving ECGs and auditory evoked response testing and peripheral nerve conduction studies.
     
  5. Khush23

    Khush23 New Member

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    Oh wow! That sounds exciting- even more so than the labs we do in Sportex! :D

    Thanks for the info!

    By the way, do you have to participate as a subject in experiments involving being injected? I hate being cannulated :/

    xxx
     
  6. Spencer Wells

    Spencer Wells Noodly Doctory Moderator

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    They don't involve cannulation - iv lignocaine is lethal so it's given subcut and no one is going to force you to do anything that you're not comfortable doing.
     
  7. Khush23

    Khush23 New Member

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    Ah right- phew! Thanks :)
     
  8. Greys Anatomy :)

    Greys Anatomy :) New Member

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    Are these tutorials PDS? Or is there system teaching in them aswell?
    Also when they say 'intergrated' does this mean that there is a mix of clinical experinece with teaching?
    And finally, with the SSC's are there opportuinites for languages? :)

    Thanks!
     
  9. Greys Anatomy :)

    Greys Anatomy :) New Member

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    anyone know the answers to the above :)
     
  10. Khush23

    Khush23 New Member

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    nope..sorry!
    However, I don't think there is much clinical teaching at all in the first 2 years!

    Hopefully Spencer Wells will be back soon to answer your questions! :)

    xxx
     
  11. jtlc2345

    jtlc2345 New Member

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    SSC-wise, yes you can study languages from French to Arabic to Japanese at various different levels depending on your prior experience. PDS runs through all five years and in pre-clinicals runs for a morning a week where you'll be in a smaller group (approx. 10) with a tutor and run through things like ethics and law, epidemiology, clinical skills and patient contact. The pre-clinical course is divided into system-based modules e.g. 'circulation and breathing' (aka heart and lungs) where you learn the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, etc... relevant to that system in an 'integrated' fashion.

    As previously mentioned, there is little clinical contact in years 1 and 2, compared with some of the other medical schools, although there is much more now than when I went through them - although one can speculate how things will change in the future with Tooke now at the helm.

    Jonathan
     
  12. Khush23

    Khush23 New Member

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    Thanks for the info! - who's Tooke?
     
  13. Barty

    Barty New Member

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    1) PDS is every Thursday morning (in the first year anyway) and is to do with practising and learning clinical skills, talking about ethical problems and a bit of patient contact. This may involve a visit into the hospital, GP surgery or an old people's home.Having said this, most of the time is spent in PDS is spent doing SGW (Small group work) in groups of about 12 with a tutor in discussion.

    2) Integrated - yes this is what it means, but it's only once a week - probably enough when you realised that when you get to medical school you are quite unprepared to handle/talk to patients in a very competent manner.

    3) Yes you can do a language - there are loads on offer. Most people stay away from them though because they can be a bit too much work on top of everything else. There is a very wide range of SSCs.
     
  14. jtlc2345

    jtlc2345 New Member

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    Professor Sir John - the new Vice Provost (Health) and Head of the Medical School. He chaired the inquiry into MMC and was previously Dean down at Peninsula.

    Jonathan
     
  15. Greys Anatomy :)

    Greys Anatomy :) New Member

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    Thanks for the info,
    anyone know which hospitals are with UCL?
    Is it just UCLH?
    Or royal free and middlesex aswell
    Thanks
     
  16. jtlc2345

    jtlc2345 New Member

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    The Middlesex Hospital doesn't exist anymore - it closed when the current University College Hospital (UCH) opened. The three main hospitals are UCH, the Royal Free and the Whittington. Then there are all the specialist hospitals such as Great Ormond Street and Moorfields and the associated District General Hospitals where we spend time stretching as far north as Luton and Stevenage and east to Basildon and Southend.

    Jonathan
     
  17. crajee

    crajee New Member

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    Hi,

    Is the above still true, with the new curriculum for UCL coming into place? What other specialist hospitals are there? Does everyone get a chance to do placements in all the hospitals mentioned above or is it merit-based? Where would be the best place to see tropical diseases?

    Thank you :)
     
  18. christhomas71

    christhomas71 New Member

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    I'm in the second year, so we're not fully integrated into the new curriculum, but from my perspective things are very much the same. There seems to be a bit more emphasis on linking the course contents to the clinical world to come, but aside from that. Teaching methods are still most lecture based, with additional group tutorials, practicals, histology computer sessions and the odd PBL.

    As mentioned above, thinking about the role of a doctor and a few practical things are dealt with on one day a week - now called the Vertical Module (a working title!) - at one of the three big hospitals i.e. UCH, Royal Free and the Whittington.

    I don't think the new curriculum has led to any further specialist hospitals being available. Having said this, the choice remains diverse, UCL encompasses many specialist centres (many of which are mentioned above). Specifically with regard to tropical diseases, the Hospital for Tropical Disease is part of UCL Hospitals Trust, so combined with the hugely diverse nature of London's population, I'm sure you'd come across whichever weird and wonderful diseases you were hoping to see.

    Finally, I'm not completely clear on how you apply for firms in later years as I've not done it myself yet, but I'm certain that if you want to gain experience in a certain area, you'll be able to do it, either through the normal curriculum, through an SSC (of which there are some really cool choices), or by making a few contacts and sorting some experience out for yourself.

    Hope this information is helpful
     
  19. Choffer333

    Choffer333 New Member

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    I'm a final year at UCL now. VM is new so I can't say how it's changed for preclinical years, but from friends in the years below it seems much the same although slightly more clincally orientated.

    UCL has links with Great Ormand street, National hospital for Neurology and Neuroscience, Moorfield Eye Hospital, The National Throat nose and ear Hospital amongst others. They're the ones you're likely to spend a day or two at.

    Hospitals in clinical years are assigned randomly you don't apply, but everyone will cover the same subject areas and in 4th year (2nd year clinics) when you go out on DGH you may be able to put in a preference or if you have a good reason, e.g. you're carer for a dependent person, or need regular medical treatment in central london you can get sent any where from the North Middlesex Hosp to Luton, Stevenage Watford even Basildon.

    Infectious diseases are currently covered in 3rd year if you're at UCH but whilst interesting is largely irrelevant to 3rd year exams and everyone covers ID in 4th year in the Women's health and communicable diseases module which includes Tropical diseases (mainly TB) HIV and GUM. There isn't much emphasis on filariasis for example but that's what elective is for in final year to get experience of tropical medicine if you want it.

    SSCs are very wide ranging and too many to mention.

    Hope that helps
     

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