surgery

yazoo

New Member
Disclaimer to the above post - I have only read a minority of scoring sheets and they were not for neurosurgery. So don't rely on my info as a given -it's just from what I have seen and recall.
 

Touche

New Member
I've been using the forums for a long time.

If you want to compare new to old I suppose you could say that ST1 and ST2 are pretty much equivalent to the old SHO, with anything ST3+ being a registrar.
Under the new system, you can actually get penalised for having too much experience. If, for example, as an FY2, you don't get into a training post for the specialty that you want, and so take a non-training post in that specialty, to get experience, you may then become ineligible to apply for entry onto the training in the future. e.g. to get on a surgery training scheme you must have less than 1 year's experience in surgery (I think). Given that you get usually 6 month's experience in it as an FY1, after 1 non-training post, you then wouldn't be allowed to apply for entry into that specialty. However, there may be the possibility of transferring in higher up, but from what I understand it's all rather wishy-washy at the moment.
Having a higher degree is also unlikely to count for much either (having a 1st class honours degree is counted the same as having a PhD at the moment).
As yazoo says a PhD is not considered equivalent to a 1st in a BSc at ST application nor further down the career treadmill. A higher degree can count for a lot at ST application not just in itself, but for showing commitment to speciality, popping out a few papers and familiarity with clinical research (which tends to be more involved than at BSc level, with students putting in ethics applications, funding requests and even supervising BSc projects etc). These are all boxes you'll want to try and tick in themselves.

FY experience does not count toward disqualifying you from ST1 applications. You are currently allowed "a year or less" which means a whole year in a non-training post after F2 is acceptable.
 

Touche

New Member

Spencer Wells

Noodly Doctory Moderator
^ There we are. More accurate better info than I can give from people who've gone through/going through it.
 
S

shahana

Guest
Yeah, I've heard the same about having a second degree, BSci of some sort. An intercalacted degree is probably the most convenient and cheapest way to this after the 3 year of the medical course. In a speciality like pathology, forensic science is particularly useful. All types of surgery would benefit from an anatomy degree in addition to the standard MBChB.
So, would a degree in Neurology be preferred or Surgery?
 

Spencer Wells

Noodly Doctory Moderator
You can't do a degree in neurology. Neurology is a medical specialty.
You can do a degree in neuroscience, which is what I'd go for.
 
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