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Path to becoming a consultant

Discussion in 'General Careers Advice' started by Steph*, Dec 1, 2007.

  1. Steph*

    Steph* New Member

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    I was just wondering if anyone could answer a quick question for me about the career ladder...

    From what I understand, after 5 or 6 years at medical school, you've got the FY1 and FY2, then you become a specialist, and then eventually you can become a consultant. How long is the gap between specialist and consultant? I've got the impression from reading up it's about 7 or 8 years, is this right?

    Also, could somebody explain to me about "banding" please? I've looked on the nhs website here http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/details/Default.aspx?Id=553 and it talks about 50% supplements, does this mean that the average basic salary for a FY1 post is much lower than what they quote?

    Thanks :)

    Steph x
     
  2. Dr Noodle

    Dr Noodle New Member

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    A supplement means in addition to doesn't it? Sorry I can't give a definitive answer to your question I'm not even a med student myself but as far as I know it depends on the speciality. I know consultant CT surgeons who became consultants in their early thirties but apparently they 'rose through the ranks faster than usual'. This is in Ireland though I'm assuming it's fairly similar over there.

    I hope you don't mind me adding another question...do you have to do postgraduate research to become a consultant?
     
  3. James

    James New Member

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    (1) Things are in flux at the moment, the traditional system was replaced by MMC last year and this is likely to be replaced by the Tooke report system from 2009.

    Currently - F1 then F2 year; then you get an ST1 & 2 in your chosen specialty (eg. surgery), then at ST3 level (ST4 in Paeds, Psych, O&G) you choose again (ie. move from being a general surgery ST to an ST in upper GI surgery), most programs then run through until ST6 or 7 when you become a consultant.

    Tooke - F1 (and a half) year. Then a three year 'core' training in relevant specialties (so for surgery think A&E, ITU and different surgical specialties). Then 'specialist' training for 4 to 5 years, then become a consultant

    (2) Banding refers to additional money you get for your out-of-hours work. So you get a basic salary of say 30K, then if you do on average X many of weekend/nights/long days you get an additional 50% (or 25, 75, 100%), making your salary 45K. Of course, whether there will be any out-of-hours work for you new EWTD compliant people who knows?

    (3) No. Although in competitive specialties (eg cardiology) this has been the norm; with the new MMC system they are trying to seperate the academics from the rest and seriously discouraging people from doing research.
     
  4. Dr Noodle

    Dr Noodle New Member

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    Eh?! I'm trying to come up with reasons for why they would do this but I can't think of any.
     
  5. James

    James New Member

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    My guess is that the government sees it as a waste. As far as they are concerned they have paid to train you and if you spend three years doing a PhD then that is three years less service provision you are providing for the NHS.

    Unfortunately with knighthood seeking sell-outs like Donaldson at the helm all they seem to care about is the quantity of consultants rather than their quality.
     
  6. Dr Noodle

    Dr Noodle New Member

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    God that's cheap.
     
  7. tangleberry

    tangleberry New Member

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    Ever heard the phrase 'don't believe eveything you read'? For years experienced SHO's/Regs would do research because that whole period of their career was like a vortex, and you basically spent your late 20's trying to fill it with things that would help you to progress. It's still like that if you do surgery in Ireland, most surgeons have to take time out to do teaching or research in order to 'plump' their CV. MMT, while fundementally flawed, was designed to give a clearer career path. Yes, it would result in less experienced consultants, but there are still the same senior consultants as before, and the difference is that those people who would've spent 7 or 8 years as a reg, who, as anyone who's worked in a hospital for any period of time will tell you, basically run the hospital out of hours and at weekends, dealing with everything a consultant would, but with fewer staff and resources.

    I know that the current trend among Junior Docs is to Donaldson bash, but at least base your arguments on facts, he got his knighthood largely as a result of his 'well woman' clinics throughout the country. I have certainly benefited greatly from the reduced working hours he implemented for junior doctors, and I'm sure many other people would agree with me, however reluctantly. We all complain about how the public blames doctors when things go wrong, lets at least try and show a little bit more intelligence and think for ourselves rather than jumping on the 'oh-so-fun' bandwagon.
     

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