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NHS professionals care support worker interview

Discussion in 'Mature Students' started by smiley_face, Dec 18, 2010.

  1. smiley_face

    smiley_face New Member

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    I have an interview next month with NHS Professionals. It states in the email that there will be a knowledge exam. I have applied for the role of Care Support Worker. Does anybody know what type of knowledge this exam will test?
     
  2. Jhesam

    Jhesam New Member

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    I'm afraid it's been over a year since I took the test myself but as I recall its very much common sense based. My guess would be that it's to weed out those who might have 'exaggerated' on their application regarding the experience since if you've done the work before you'd have a hard time failing this test as it's based on the things you learn in the mandatory training and on the job.

    The only specific questions I can remember are:

    List the things you would do if you found a patient collapsed.

    List 5 things you could do to help a patient with impaired hearing.

    Fill in this fluid balance chart (If you can add whole numbers you'll be fine with this).

    So best of luck, however the hardest thing to do with NHSP is get the interview in the first place so congratulations!
     
  3. Jhesam

    Jhesam New Member

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    No, that's totally fine. It was really the care side of the work that's under scrutiny. From what I recall nothing on observations monitoring came up. By 'things you learn on the job' I mean that in the above example question about the collapsed patient that you'd call for help/put the call out then get on with your ABC's which you'd have from mandatory training and as I was on a cardiology ward, unfortunately quite a few instances in real life.

    As for the fluid balance chart it gave you an example chart with hourly spacings to write in, told you how much fluid was in various example drinks (eg cup of tea 120ml) and told you what drinks a patient had had over the course of the day and at what times, so you'd just fill in the blanks and keep a cumulative total. So Mrs Jones would have a cup of tea at 8, 12 and half a cup at 4. You'd just whack in the table the volume she'd drunk at those times individually and cumulatively.

    But frankly I found my year of elderly mental illness more useful than my time on the cardiology ward for this post as there was more thought put into the job and a greater amount of personal care undertaken.

    Which trust are you applying to out of interest?
     
  4. Clarkey

    Clarkey I have girl bits ok? :)

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    My test down in Hampshire sounds exactly the same. It wasn't especially difficult and was about you being safe rather than being an expert on patient management. :)
     
  5. Jhesam

    Jhesam New Member

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    Yep, thats the test. They break it up into three specialties; general, mental health and paeds. I took the general one and I'm not sure if you'd be taking the general or mental health exam. On the interview day there was a face to face 'interview' which was completely pre-formulated and asks about your work experience and how many hours you want to work (Lots!) but that really came across as more of a formality. Once I did the exam I went home and waited a couple of weeks for the documentation to come through.

    Ahh Trafford, about the only hospital in Manc I've not worked in. Your story sounds a lot like mine except I was coming in with an arts degree and all the wrong A-levels. The Nursing auxiliary/HCA/CSW experience is invaluable and I rather wish they made it compulsary for medical students. Ah well.
     
  6. Jhesam

    Jhesam New Member

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    Ahhh, yeah I forgot they've moved the training online now (despite having sat through online mandatory training yesterday..). Manchesters great, had a few niggling worries last year as I turned down a decent 5 year course in London to do 6 years in Manc but I actually wanted to do PBL and now I'm in first year proper I'm glad I'm here.
     
  7. Bad'un Raddon

    Bad'un Raddon New Member

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    I resent that statement. I'm currently a HCA and I'm HUGELY arrogant and have a GIGANTIC ego.

    But joking aside, you're possibly right. However, I'm yet to meet any young doctors who fit the arrogant doctor stereotype. I think they're a minority, if not traditionally then probably nowadays. Forcing everyone who wants to be a doctor to work giving bed-baths and helping elderly people to the toilet before applying would be much like forcing all army officers to be rank-&-file squaddies for a while first, or a politician to have done a little of every job for which he proposes laws about.

    I can see that its possibly a very good idea, but I do not think its a necessary thing to make ALL prospective med students do (and this is coming from an actual HCA, so it'd be awfully easy for me to agree with you!)
     
  8. smiley_face

    smiley_face New Member

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    Failed the exam, got 31/40. :(
     

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