1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Medicine seems to keep coming back to me..

Discussion in 'Mature Students' started by EternalRose, Jan 31, 2011.

  1. EternalRose

    EternalRose New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Everyone,

    Well I am 24 years old, I did the first 18 months of nursing, but left because it wasnt for me. I felt very unchallenged academically. Ive now got an 9 month old baby, and worry that I have not got a career in place and that I need to get something sorted to secure her future. I joined NMM in 2003, this is how long I have been to-ing and fro-ing over this issue. I recently got offered a place to study midwifery at my last choice uni for this september. In my heart, I know its not my passion because I worry that it wont give me the same sense of intellectual satisfaction that medicine ever could. I know I would make a good midwife, but I know that I could never be happy as JUST a midwife, I would need to do more and more i.e PhD e.t.c I feel that medicine would give me the intellectual stimulation that I crave. I enrolled on an access to human sciences course to keep my mind ticking over..and so far I have achieved 11 distinctions, in biology, chemistry and physics. Something, I never thought I was capable of. I worry that if I go for medicine, I will fail. So I know this is an insecurity issue. My fiance is happy that I have been given my place for midwifery but I KEEP FINDING MYSELF coming back on this forum and reading posts from time to time, why cant I just believe in myself and go for it. I said to my partner, I worry that when I am a student midwife I will wish I could be doing what the doctors are doing. I used to do that when I was a student nurse..what am I doing?

    Pointless post I guess..just needed to get it out.
     
  2. EternalRose

    EternalRose New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks bemyenemy for replying,

    I dont think you were harsh at all, and I do think I am a bit silly for applying for midwifery when I didnt think nursing was 'enough' for me. Dont get me wrong, nursing/midwifery are brilliant careers but like you..I need something a little more substantial. I dont have any A levels..just my gcses, this access course I am doing at the moment and my 18 months of my nursing diphe. I could do the lambeth access to medicine course which I have been eyeing up for months. I wish I could apply to cowa or CCN or sussex downs but the reality of the matter is that I cant with a fiance at uni here. He graduates Sept 2012 so in theory it could work out quite well if I applied this year for medical school with 4 fresh new unis..(dare I let myself think about it...) I really am thinking about deferring my offer for 2012 so if I didnt get in, I had a fallback option or plan b but a big part of me is feeling like I should just give it a go and get some confidence!
     
  3. EternalRose

    EternalRose New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    0
    This would mean, I would potentially have two access courses under my belt..or I could go and do some A levels..I have to think very carefully. If I do midwifery and decide to do medicine, It will be a bad choice no way in hell I could afford GEP fees.
     
  4. Genevieve

    Genevieve New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi,

    I'm a qualified midwife so thought I would comment on your dilemma. Midwifery is now degree only (in Scotland at least) but nursing is still a diploma with top-up option. Having studied the course and now doing honours and with friends who studied the nursing degree, Midwifery is more academically challenging than nursing, hence the higher entry requirements, but not as much as medicine will be. I see you did do quite a bit of your general, and we had a girl in my class who had done 1 year then quit and became a DE midwife. I cannot stress enough the difference between nurses and midwives roles. We are always grouped together because midwives used to have to be nurses etc, but they really are entirely different so i get why you had thought about it.

    I feel that Midwifery was not enough for me academically but also in practice, the autonomy that we are supposed to have is hard to come by in a CLU. Doctors are not so protocol bound as nurses and midwives.
    I think if it's medicine you want to stimulate you academically then don't do midwifery- it's no easy ride and your heart really does have to be in it to survive the course. On placement the med students have it wayyyy easier (and they still get better holidays!!).

    All the best in whatever you decide to do x
     
  5. EternalRose

    EternalRose New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Genevieve, love that name..:D

    Yes, I have an offer for the midwifery degree this september..but I worry about feeling unfulfilled academically again. I just applied for an access to medicine course...either that or I will apply for A levels. I find it interesting that you mentioned about the autonomy in a CLU, there is quite a strong obsetrician presence so I have wondered about whether I would ever get that feeling of autonomy, unless I was to work in the community. Congratulations on your 1st in Midwifery, did you know all along it wasnt for you?
     
  6. Profanius

    Profanius New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2009
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello Rose

    I'm inclined to agree with BeMyEnemy. If you found nursing unstimulating I'm not sure midwifery is going to rock your world either. Doing a midwifery degree would be wasteful and you would be occupying the place of someone who genuinely wanted to be a midwife.

    I do a lot of volunteer ambulance work and although I have a massive respect for paramedics I certainly know that the job isn't for me. Part of it is similar to your own thoughts, I would get bored of it very quickly.

    What is it that makes you want to be a doctor? If it's intellectual stimulation you're looking for then there are alternatives. I was looking at chiropractic a couple of years ago. The academic entry requirements are similar to medicine and the students I spoke to seemed to love it, and they were very talented people. Alas it's considered alternative therapy in this country but in other nations it's regarded as mainstream healthcare.

    If you do genuinely want to study medicine, and for better reasons than you find it intellectually stimulating, then go for it. By the sound of it you certainly have the academic ability to do medicine. Don't let a lack confidence stop you. No-one is going to laugh at you if you don't succeed. Trying and failing is better better than never trying at all - atleast you won't spend your life thinking about what might have been.

    It sounds like you already know what you want to do (especially since you joined NMM in 2003), but you just need a shove. Tell your fiance to read this forum and then buy him a cattle prod for valentine's day. If he loves you then he'll have you shoved into medicine by 2012 :)
     
  7. EternalRose

    EternalRose New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks profanius, Well Psychiatry has always interested me as a speciality, but then I am very fascinated by all things related to the human body, scientifically. Naturally caring in nature, with lack of self confidence, I thought nursing/midwifery was for me and I am not from a middle classed background and no one in my family has been to university. However, during my time at college I have proved that I can excel in the subjects that really matter. Its not just about it being " academically stimulating " for me, as I agree there are many other professions that could do just that, but I have been here since 2003..:lol: So, I may just be on the right track..just about..haha. I think your right when you say, trying and failing is better than not trying at all..I just need to get this beleif.
     
  8. MEDEVAC

    MEDEVAC New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2007
    Messages:
    354
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know how you feel - I first looked in 2006 and nearly applied oin 2007 but got scared and the last 4 years have shown me that it isn't a passing interest. I had to accept this and apply. I'm single with no children so it's different but it sounds to me like you should apply yourself into getting into med school. It also sounds like you can do it.

    You only live once. Good luck.
     
  9. EternalRose

    EternalRose New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ok, small update I have decided to apply for 4 A levels at a college near me. I will be doing them full time, as after speaking to a woman from Lambeth college Im not sure if its the best option for me. She told me there is a 25% acceptance rate, and she said more than likely I will get rejected. So I will need a plan B, (what, midwifery? lol) She also said medical schools dont like it if I have come from a nursing background! Sigh. Not a lot I can do about that, as I will be putting my care experience on my application! There is no quick way round this, and I dont see why there should be. Im just going to have to get on with it. I will get onto my Alevels course this Sept, and apply to medical schools next year. (How exciting) Thanks again for all your support and advice.
     
  10. cocopop

    cocopop New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't know why people come out with these unqualified statements, maybe to try and scare people off I don't know, but it's completely untrue to say that medical schools don't like applicants from a nursing background so don't worry about that. There's plenty of ex-nurses and HCA's on my course including a bloke who was an intensive care nurse I believe, and a good friend of mine who's a psychiatric nurse will be taking up her place at Nottingham med school in September. I wish you the very best of luck.
     
  11. Profanius

    Profanius New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2009
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree with cocopop. This is horsesh!t of the first order. I've never heard of any medical school which discriminates against nurses. This may have been true 30 years ago, but I know of several nurses who have retrained or are retraining as doctors through either GEP or standard entry and nurses on medicine degrees are quite common.

    I know some Unis may not consider a nursing degree adequate for their GEP entry (e.g. Bristol), but other Unis like Leicester actively discriminate in favour of nurses.

    Alas, some careers advice from colleges is nowhere near what it should be.

    Don't worry about the 25% acceptance rate - you got onto a midwifery course and they have a far lower acceptance rates. You're probably of a much higher calibre than most of their candidates.

    Med schools may not be too excited by an unfinished degree and you will be expected to demonstrate more recent experience than your student nurse days, but it's no cause for concern.
     
  12. Martigan

    Martigan Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    2,535
    Likes Received:
    28
    My experience is also in line with CocoPop and Profanius. If you want further examples, look at Kings, (considered to be the most demanding medschool by many) their 4-Year course is also aimed at healthcare professions. The P in Kings GPEP name for it's course is for Professional.

    I work, for SGUL's "Nursing and Midwifery" Faculty. The midwifery course is our Faculty's GEP course in terms of entry standards. You have already proved your pedigree once, you can do it again!
     
  13. EternalRose

    EternalRose New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the support. Im a bit stuck, called all the unis I like and none of them apart from one would accept the lambeth access to med course. The tutor at Lambeth blatantly lied and told me Barts accept the access course, I just come off the phone to them now and they said that they don't accept any access courses?! I would love to go to UCL, so I am thinking A Levels is the best route UCL accept cowa access course but I cant just up my family and move to Norfolk unfortunately. Same with sussex access to med. I called Bsms and they told me to not do A levels, but do the lambeth access course, but that is just one place!! I would need to put down 3 other choices. Lambeth said its best to apply for the 6 year courses if doing their access course which I really think is a waste of time. I might as well do A Levels if I am using up two years and haven't even started the actual medicine course. I'm on iPad, please excuse any suspect errors. Lol.
     
    #13 EternalRose, Feb 2, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2011
  14. Lyns

    Lyns New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Messages:
    369
    Likes Received:
    0
    I agree with the others with regards to previous nurses being accepted to med school. One of my close friends was a paediatric nurse and appled for GEP medicine and got in no problems.

    Medicine is a long commitment and i think you have to be really certain it's for you. Have you done any medical work experience in hospital? - its totally different seeing things from a doctors perspective.

    A levels are a good way to go if you have not done them previously as GEP is seriously competitive and the access courses are only good for a few unis.

    Good luck with your A levels :)
     
  15. EternalRose

    EternalRose New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2010
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Lyns, I didnt do a degree at uni..I 'started' and did not complete a nursing diphe. So I have the first year of it under my belt. Im very sure medicine is where I should be. 8 years on this forum is a long time! lol. I get the impression my partner is feeling a little intimidated though...but thats another story.
     
  16. Martigan

    Martigan Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    2,535
    Likes Received:
    28
    Also do understand it can take a few attempts to get in. But if its your dream, don't give up!
     
  17. Profanius

    Profanius New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2009
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello Rose.

    Personally I would avoid Lambeth as I've heard nothing but bad things about it. Their admissions department is something of a joke and rife with misinformation. They also have a very poor success rate for people going on to medschool... something like 5-10%. The campus is something of a hole aswell. Compare it with COWA and well... there is no comparison.

    If moving your family is not an option and going to Uni in London is preferred then A-levels will certainly be a better option.
     

Share This Page