Least competitive Universities in the UK for Medicine?

Discussion in 'Cardiff Medical School' started by Lauralou, Mar 18, 2011.

  1. Lauralou

    Lauralou New Member

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    I am a 2nd year Bsc Nursing student and have my heart set on doing medicine as soon as I complete this degree.

    I am wondering,

    1)what Universities have the bast ratios of applicants to places available?

    2) what unis are more friendly towards nursing graduates?

    I feel i should apply to the 5 years courses rather than the GEP courses as i would have more chances of success.

    Advice on this would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks :)
     
  2. rjm26

    rjm26 New Member

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    Have you considered the extreme lack of funding for the 5 year course as a graduate? People always say "I would find a way to make it work" but the reality is its hard enough to do that even for the 4 year with a lot of NHS funding!

    Also, at a lot of undergrad unis you are not competing with the undergrads as such for places, you are comepeting with other graduates because they have a set quota for how many grads/mature applicants they will take (so you have no advantage over the undergrads).

    A lot of 5 year courses also ask for specific A level subjects or grades.

    This is a good place to start: Medschoolsonline - Medical Course Guide for Graduates - Graduate Entry 4-Year Courses

    It shows you what universities need specific A level subjects/grades or degree subjects/classification.
    The percentage is also how many applicants get a place. However, you've got to remember this is the TOTAL number of applicants BEFORE they have used the UKCAT and GAMSAT etc to cull a lot of applicants. After this, you normally have about a 1 in 3 chance of getting a place if you get to the interview stage. At which point you will probably do really well because as a nurse you've got loads of relevant experience, and also good communication skills.

    Hope that helps.
     
  3. Lauralou

    Lauralou New Member

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    Thanks rjm26, much appreciated. Just hard to decide on which courses and unis' I would have the best chances with and narrow it down to 5 also I have Biology alevel but don't have chemistry so I suppose that narrows the courses down a bit more. The funding ofcourse is a joke. Congrats on your offer!..
     
  4. wanabanana

    wanabanana New Member

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    This is not true and there is no logical why it would be the case. Graduates on a standard 5 year course, on average, do significantly better than their younger colleagues academically and are more likely to finish the course. Universities have funding for a limited number of places and they want the best potential candidates who are most likely to last the distance, whether they are 17 or 37.

    As a nursing graduate you will be in a fantastic position if you applied for the 5 year course, but like the previous poster said that comes with serious financial obstacles - particularly with the forthcoming rise in tuition fees (which as a graduate you will have to pay up front as you won't get a loan from the SLC). I would recommend mixing your choices on your UCAS form and go for 2 GEPs and 2 5-year programmes in order to hedge your bets :)

    Good luck in whatever you choose to do!
     
  5. rjm26

    rjm26 New Member

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    Yeah it is true, I think you misunderstood what I'm saying.

    For example, if you applied to UEA, you are competing directly against the undergrads for places, so then you might have a better chance...

    But at Leeds for example they have a set quota to only have 10% of places on the course given to graduates. So you are not competing against the undergrad applicants, you are being compared to the other grad applicants.

    So what I'm saying is, at some med schools you don't actually increase your chances by applying to an undergrad course.

    Does this make more sense?
     
  6. Lauralou

    Lauralou New Member

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    Right so when applying for the 5yr courses i'm best finding out what courses don't have a set quota for graduates..

    Also can anyone recommend some good GAMSAT and UKCAT books?
     
  7. ceih

    ceih New Member

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    As a tip, Peninsula don't have a set graduate quota, but their GAMSAT cut off is high at 64 (2011 entry).
     

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