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ISC Medical Interview Course:) PLEASE HELP:)

Discussion in 'Medical School Interviews' started by vik94, Feb 9, 2012.

  1. vik94

    vik94 New Member

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    Hi
    I am thinking of booking for the ISC Medical Interview Course and would really like some feedback off the people who know about this course or have been to it.
    Thankyou
     
  2. sa119

    sa119 New Member

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    I've been to this course and didn't find it the least bit helpful. The group size was way too big, it didn't give everyone a chance to contribute - only those with the biggest mouths and loudest voices!
     
  3. chickenlittle

    chickenlittle New Member

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    Have heard that if you really think you need more practice, then take the one-on-one with them.
     
  4. sa119

    sa119 New Member

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    Personally, I think there are better people to have one-to-ones with. PM me if you want a list!

    There's no harm in buying the ISC book, even though the example answers are super contrived. I had the misfortune of meeting someone who had pretty much swallowed the book - bad idea!
     
  5. Martigan

    Martigan Super Moderator

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    Personally I don't rate any of these courses, but then again, I haven't been on them, so I'm going off 2nd hand info. I'm also a little prejudiced against them, as I have seen far to many times when the people selling these type of courses have created accounts in here and pretended to be applicants to big up the course. To me any course that needs to promote its self by underhand means seems to be lacking in qualities that justify it's cost.

    However I do know some great guys on my course who have done some of these and gained from them. They were less positive about the value for money, but that is a personal thing which depends on your own personal wealth and financial support.

    To me its quiet a personal thing. It depends on what you need support on and how much that there is a real issue or just and issue of confidence.

    But don't underrate how important confidence is. As it helps you come across better in an interview and relaxes you enough that you can avoid looking up, so can best show your potential.

    You can probably get all the advice and support you need off a website like this, by getting involved in the debate and discussion. However its not all nicely packaged up and you some times need to filter out the trolls and the naive.

    You can even get advice on how to manage your self through the entry exams. However you still need to have the self discipline to provide yourself the the structure to study. If that is an issue for you, that's where one of these course may be well suited to you. You know yourself better that anyone here, so only you can really make that call. - Though its pretty hard when you have no independent reviews of these courses.

    To me, I personally believe that most people can find better, more appropriate support themselves for free. But you might well have to look and think out of the box to find it.

    But if you have the money to spare, these courses may help.

    But good luck. It is a scary, hard ride, but hopefully rewarding in the end.
     
  6. alancam

    alancam New Member

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    For those applying for 2013-2014, have a look into PotMed and U.CAN Mock It! at Imperial. I went to both, helped me on the cheap.

    Dr Prep is another option--never went on their courses but they do a couple of deals every now and again so I hear.

    I bought the ISC book which helped a bit but make sure you think for yourself. Also, "So you want to be a doctor?" is good. The "Very Short Introduction to Medical Ethics" (think that's the title) was excellent.
     
  7. Profanius

    Profanius New Member

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    I work in the HR department for a rather large company and write some of the guidelines for interviews and interview techniques, for both managers and internal candidates. I've probably conducted or assisted with several hundred interviews over the years. I've also just sat three med school interviews and have to say that each one was a very different experience.

    I can't honestly imagine a course that will provide you with the practice in all styles or prepare you entirely for what's ahead. The most important thing to remember is that you will invariably be interviewed by doctors/clinical lecturers at med school while the people running these courses certainly won't be, and can only provide their perception of what a doctor would look for. Also, these courses can only help with your interview technique or delivery, they can't really help with what to say, which can only come from your own expereince and interest.

    Interview technique is a skill and it can be learned, while some people will have more or less innate ability. At the end of the day, no matter what the role, interviewers are looking for the same thing. If you can come across as intelligent, honest, confident, motivated, etc. while tempering it with humility and sincerity then you will go far. Interviewers are looking at your potential more than anything.

    Like horse-riding, bomb disposal or street fighting these skills can only really be learned by experience rather than books or instruction, but you can get this experience anywhere. Just by talking to someone who has to interview or recruit staff you can learn a great deal about what they look for e.g. your local pub landlord. A lot of big companies run internal interview coaching for employees etc. The more people you talk to the more you can decide for yourself what is useful and what isn't. I thoroughly recommend applying for a job you have no intention of taking, just so you can experience a real interview with none of the anxiety clouding it.

    Interview answers don't have to be perfect. A weak answer delivered in a sincere and confident manner beats a great answer delivered in an arrogant or hesitant one... and anything beats no answer at all.

    The ISC interview book is quite useful as it does provide food for thought, but the sample answers are horribly contrived and should be avoided. If you are really worried about your interview technique then these courses might be worth the money. If they man the difference between getting med school or not then they could be priceless, but there are probably easier and cheaper ways of getting the same experience.
     
  8. sv1009

    sv1009 New Member

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    I personally found courses that were cheap just as good as the big companies that charge way too much. Any thing that is £100+ per a day is probably not worth it. I would go look for cheap courses. I found supportingyourfuture courses the best and they were the cheapest of all the courses I went on.
     
  9. Dr. Ahmad Momani

    Dr. Ahmad Momani New Member

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    The medical profession seems in total disarray about the role of group discussions at medical interviews. As of this year, group discussions will be taken out of the selection process for GP trainees, but are now playing a increasingly important role in consultant interviews, CT/ST interviews and even interviews for medical school entry.

    On the whole, group discussions can be done in two ways:

    Group discussion between several candidates taking place in the recruitment process (typical of medical school interviews, consultant interviews, and in the past, GPST selection centres).

    Facilitation of a group discussion by one candidate, the rest of the group being made up of different members of the recruitment panel (sometimes found in consultant interviews)

    Topics to be discussed in group format at medical interviews include ethical issues, current political issues or difficult work-related issues such as the handling of a difficult colleague.
     

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