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Biology or Human Biology A level?

Discussion in 'Mature Students' started by maybe, May 7, 2008.

  1. maybe

    maybe New Member

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    Hiya

    Now I've got the chemistry A level sorted I was wondering what people think regarding biology or human biology A level... I would prefer to do human biology (thinking of NEC) but have a little doubt that it may not be seen as academically robust as biology.

    Any opinions gratefully received...

    M
     
  2. aspirant doc

    aspirant doc New Member

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    Hi.

    First up, check with the medical schools you are interested in that they'll accept it. Phone and ask, simple as that.

    I can see no reason why they wouldn't - it's still A level, it's still biology and it's far more relevant to a medical degree than knowing the ecology of an inner city pond with a gently rusting Sainsbury's trolley in it, or the life cycle of the lesser known home counties' slug, how stoats decide to shag eachother, or the nutritional requirements of an acorn at week 3 of its development etc etc.

    For what it's worth, I did Scottish Higher in hum bio to get in.

    Nick
     
  3. doormat

    doormat New Member

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    Just do the straight bio,

    Some admissions selectors will just laugh when they see human biology. Not joking,
     
  4. Gizmo says -

    Gizmo says - New Member

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    why would they laff if they're not joking.

    further more, why laff at uman biol?
     
  5. doormat

    doormat New Member

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    I meant that I wasn't joking, i.e. deadly serious about it.

    I can't be sure, but lets think of the average age of an admissions selector, and then think of what year human biology was introduced as an alternative to straight.

    We all know that noone likes change, least of all those in their audacious ivory towers!
     
  6. Caroline M

    Caroline M New Member

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    I undertook A Level Human Bio via the Oxford Distance Learning College, from whom strangely enough I received the NEC resource pack. Examinations are Edexcel, and four of the six modules are common across the Human Bio and Bio syllabus. The remaining two differ in their context, but essentially cover the same core themes. As an example in unit 2, Human Biologists consider Exchange, transport and reproduction specifically in humans whereas straight biologists cover much of the same material, but less so (i.e. no environmental adaptation / pregnancy, birth and post-natal period), in order that they can also cover off plant reproduction.

    The proof that both courses are so closely aligned is in the fact that the synopsis paper is common.

    If I had to choose all over again, I'd still choose Human. I found with DL that you are out on a limb – you need motivation, discipline with a dash of resilience. This comes much more easily if you're studying subject matter that is at worst vaguely interesting. Less so if you are trying to memorise the steps in photosynthesis.

    When applying this year - GKT, Barts, BSMS - I contacted all three and enquired about the status of Human bio. The message I received from all three was not so much that Human bio is accepted, but that no distinction is made between Bio and Human Bio, therefore it's a non question. Take the good advice above and contact those unis where you want to apply. Beyond that, study the course which will keep you engaged, resulting in the best grade.

    Good luck!
     
  7. aspirant doc

    aspirant doc New Member

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    I diasagree with that. Nowadays medical schools take a wider variety of people, arts graduates, people who have had other professions, people in their 30s and 40s. Medical schools have embraced a lot of change; what a particular admissions tutor might think is irrelevant - if an applicant meets the requirements, they meet the requirements and there's no room for an individual tutor deciding hum bio is low grade, especially if it's one of the qualifications the medical school accepts.

    Plenty do accept hum bio.
     

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